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Basically you are compressing the fluid until something gives. There is no other place for the air bubbles to go other than the highest point which is the fill tank. I remember this from my fluid dynamics course many moons ago. Different compression rates less dense air will give to the more dense fluid. Does that make better sense?
 

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What I don't get is why the air would rise in the lines under pressure, but not at rest?! Simple physics dictates that air is going to rise to the highest point it can reach providing it is less dense then the surounding fluid. I don't see how varying pressure would change anything...and I have a good grasp of physics, using it to solve day-to-day problems.
 

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I understand that the Fluid under pressure puts the air bubbles under pressure and allows them to rise to the surface quicker than at normal pressure...

Explained that way it makes perfect logic... Thanks Again for letting me see things in a different light and allowing me to do something in a new way.... :) :) :) :)
 

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By appling force or pressure to miss-matched surface areas, a dynamic reaction takes place. Hence the air bubbles will move to the less compressed holding tank.
 

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The other recation that is taking place is miss- matched surface tension. The brake fluid will pull the air bubbles along to the surface, because the like molecules, aka brake fluid want an equallized surface tension.
 

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Ask your self this, if you look at a syringe filled with and air bubbles, once you flick the side appling a slight pressure change why does the traped air move to the top?
 

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Umm.. because you flicked it off the side of the syringe??

:bsflag:

My brain tells me that with the fluid under pressure, the bubble(s) is/are going to get smaller, hence less likely to move at all.
 

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I didn’t mean for this to get into a thermal fluid dynamics discussion. This method has worked well for me over the last 15 years or so. You can chose to what you want to do with the information. Try it once, if does not work for you don’t do it again. That will be all the proof you need to make the correct hypnosis. :beerchug:
 

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this not the gospel, so do this at your own risk/abilities so if your cant do it take it to a trained tech. but this will give you some insight as to how it is done.
i used RFI bleeder kit we sell thru our store.
guys this might help if you are having a F&*K of a time trying yourself or your dealer is trying to bleed your clutch.
i used a RFI (reverse fluid injector) its a pistol grip syringe basically, that acts as a hand held master cylinder.
ideally, you would have youre slave cylinder out of the tranny on the bench for this. but it can be done in the car as well.
you will want to remove the throw out bearing so the spring under it can come can off of the slave cylinder. (on the stock truck slave there is a spring clip, on the Viper slave you twist the throw bearing so the retaining tab lines up with the removal slot.)
loosen the bleeder & compress the piston in the slave by sliding the throw out bearing back on & squeezing it down until it stops at the bottem. inject fluid into the slave thru the bleeder port until it pushes the throw out bearing out until it is even with the end of the slave cylinder. tigtnen the bleeder, & reassemble the throw out bearing & spring assy.
THIS IS WHERE MY SYSTEM HAD A PROBLEM. i had air between the piston cups. inject fluid thru the poppet valve at the end of the line up to the master cylinder, being carfull not to overfill the resevoir. do this until no more bubbles appear. then remove the master cylinder from the truck -just 2 bolts- & remove the clip that holds the plunger assy in the master. then remove the plunger holding it upside down with the braided line hanging down as not to let air back in to it. fill up the master cylinder body with new brake fluid to the very top. slowly & carefully minding not to tear a piston cup assemble the plunger. it will over flow the brake fluid, thats the idea so it dosent have trapped air in it. you may need any assistant to hold down the plunger so you can put the spring clip back in. wipe everything down & reinstall the MC.
you have no air in the system, when your pedal has no more than 3/4-1" of freeplay before you feel pressure with your hand.
to tell if your slave or MC is the problem, disconnect the line from the slave by pushing in the plastic clip with pliers & pushing then pulling on the line while pushing in the plastic sleeve. if the pedal is immediatly hard to push (with your hand) the slave has air in it. if is spongy the MC (and also maybe the slave) has air in it.
i used Motul Racing Brake Fluid, we use it on our roadracing bikes, as it has one of the highest boiling points and is packaged in nitrogen so it wont asorb moisture. this stuff is GOOD!
also, instulate the clutch line a little better with some heat wrap, and on the earlier model '04's, make sure your line is secured to the firewall away from the exhaust pipe. i actually used header wrap around the exhaust pipe there to keep heat away from the clutch, line & tranny, i do both sides when we do an install. it keeps the cab area cooler, and the tranny as well!
Thanks for sharing it.It's very useful and helpful for me and i find my solution from it.Thumbs up for you
 

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Can the next person that does this take some pictures? I'm going to have to read through the thread a few times and try to get my thoughts in order so I can work out the kinks at each step of the process. That said, thank you for starting the thread at all @BOOMER. The information is definitely much appreciated for people who are looking to get a bit of a fix-up at home at their own convenience. Cheers!
 
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